A critical review of the Darfur Crisis: analysing the effectiveness of the United Nations Security Council and the International Criminal Court

Lodge, Ashleigh Marie (2016) A critical review of the Darfur Crisis: analysing the effectiveness of the United Nations Security Council and the International Criminal Court. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Since gaining independence from Great Britain in 1956 Sudan has been a country of civil unrest Continuous wars have overwhelmed the country prompting what was to be one of the worst humanitarian disasters of the 21st century. This dissertation aims to examine the response made by the two major international institutions involved within the crisis; the United Nation Security Council and the International Criminal Court.
    Due to the nature of the topic in discussion, the method of investigation was a literature review utilising the valuable secondary data surrounding Darfur. A combination of journal articles and official reports from governmental and non-governmental organisations were used allowing for a wide variety of sources to be used.
    This thesis critically examined the reasons behind the involvement of both institutions offering a range of explanations in to the lack of immediate intervention. It further highlighted difficulties that the United Nations Security Council and International Criminal Court faced and, how they tried to overcome these.
    Throughout the analysis, it was made evident that the United Nations Security Council did not act instantly to the concerns brought to them b international bodies surrounding the c1isis. When they did, it was slow and restrained prompting considerable concern of man non-governmental organisations. It failed to cooperate fully with the International Criminal Court which made arresting the individuals deemed responsible for the atrocities in Darfur difficult.
    Through the extensive research it was apparent that the United Nations Security Council is in need of reform. The institutions failed to end the violence in Darfur effectively, resulting in mass displacement and thousands of deaths of innocent civilians. The lack of legitimacy that is sieged throughout both institutions has come to
    the forefront of international politics, in order to intervene more effectively in future atrocities such as the Darfur case this has to be overcome. They must seek to cooperate more efficiently to ensure this vital partnership succeeds in maintaining international peace and security throughout the global community.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Oct 2016 10:31
    Last Modified: 20 Oct 2016 10:31
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22449

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