The mind of a child is enquiring, if we don't educate them, the streets will: a critical examination of the attitudes that prevent the teaching of Child Sexual Exploitation in schools in England and Wales

Brown, Tia-Helena (2016) The mind of a child is enquiring, if we don't educate them, the streets will: a critical examination of the attitudes that prevent the teaching of Child Sexual Exploitation in schools in England and Wales. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The subject of Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) has received increasing attention in recent ears following a number of high-profile legal cases. Although there is a lack of empirical data surrounding the subject the growing attention has identified a series of policy imperatives clarifying agency responsibilities and the expected responses to the issue. A response suggested by many, towards tackling the problem of CSE, is increasing the awareness and teaching of it through schools. This would be implemented through a subject called Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education (PSHE). PSHE currently stands as a non-statutory subject, and , will keep this status until further notice, a decision that was made this year by the Education Minister, Nicky Morgan (Burns, 2016). Although many key figures in the education system have asked for this implementation, the attitudes towards the topic remain pessimistic. Through conducting detailed interviews with professional respondents who work with children exposed to CSE, this research has identified four key areas affecting the teaching of CSE in school: The status of PSHE; Awareness of CSE; Attitudes towards the teaching of PSHE and Sex Relationship Education (SRE) and Parents, Culture and Religion. Further dissection of each area reveals the are often interlinked, enhancing the complexity of the issue and creating further perplexity around the phenomena. As a result, a number of recommendations have been suggested to encourage the government to reconsider their decision to keep PSHE as a non-statutory subject; bring about more awareness of CSE amongst the public schools, governors and children; foster strong working relationships with parents to ensure that the curriculum is suitable and age-appropriate, and finally to develop effective strategies to increase the number of schools implementing preventative measures and teaching CSE across England and Wales.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Oct 2016 10:19
    Last Modified: 20 Oct 2016 10:19
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22447

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