Maternal incarceration: a qualitative study of its effects

Ash, Ivor (2016) Maternal incarceration: a qualitative study of its effects. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Over the past two decades the rate of female imprisonment has doubled reaching a peak in 2002 under the New Labour government 1997-2010. With the overall female prison population rising so did the rate of incarcerated mothers. This research is concerned with firstly the reasons why more mothers than ever were/are being incarcerated. Secondly what is the effect of maternal incarceration on both the mother and child and the bond between the two. The answer to these questions were gained in a qualitative manner by interviewing previously incarcerated mothers about their experiences and the effects it has on them and their children. There is pre-existing extensive literature into the effects of maternal incarceration, most of which conclude that maternal incarceration has adverse effects on both the mother and child and that the mother is somewhat a victim of the penal institution that is prison. To some extent this research compliments these arguments. However, hat this research has found is that there is a holistic argument for the benefits of maternal incarceration, particularly for the mother that previous studies have largely ignored. This research does not try to and cannot speak for the general female prison population. However findings of this research present aspects of the current discourse surrounding maternal incarceration and its effects that fails to represent the experiences of the mothers interviewed for this study.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Oct 2016 09:53
    Last Modified: 20 Oct 2016 09:53
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22441

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