Adolescence, sex and incarceration: a theoretical analysis of youth incarceration in England and Wales and its consequences for the adolescent development process

Harris, Charlotte Victoria Elizabeth (2016) Adolescence, sex and incarceration: a theoretical analysis of youth incarceration in England and Wales and its consequences for the adolescent development process. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Youth incarceration du ring adolescence is complex, with the potential for tragic consequences. The overall aim of this research was to investigate the nature of youth incarceration in the United Kingdom and the extent to which it impacts an adolescent's education, family and relationships. Secondary research was examined to investigate the complexities of an adolescent's development, taking advantage of a key word filter system
    to maintain relevance. This paper discovered that the unique experience of youth incarceration in England and Wales seems to contribute to anxieties and unrealistic expectations about sexual and romantic relationships post release. In addition, that time incarcerated, could result in young offenders leaving the criminal justice system with attachment and relationship difficulties, which could have significant repercussions for relationships in adulthood. Potentially resulting in few social bonds, known to be a prerequisite for future reoffending. Currently, there is a variety of research on relationships and desistance. However, research looking at developmental difficulties caused by incarceration is relatively lacking. Therefore, recommendations were made that future primary research should be undertaken over a incarcerated offenders life span, studying how incarceration during adolescence can effect romantic relationships in adulthood. Academics and policy makers may then have an idea of just how significant time incarcerated can be to a young offender's future relationships,. moreover, how this may affect desistance from crime in future.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 19 Oct 2016 16:16
    Last Modified: 19 Oct 2016 16:16
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22425

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