Anglo-Scandinavian penal exceptionalism: possibility or a pipedream?

Nicholas, Peter (2016) Anglo-Scandinavian penal exceptionalism: possibility or a pipedream? BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The prison system in England and Wales fails to meet the requirements needed to rehabilitate an offender. Inhumane prison conditions and overcrowding within dated and draconian structures demonstrate the inherent need for improvement within the British penal system. Reoffending rates in England and Wales have consistently remained around 50 percent for over a decade whereas in Norway, the reoffending rate is significantly lower at around 20 percent. In light of these statistics and the humane treatment and conditions of incarceration, John Pratt produced the 'exceptionalism' thesis deeming Nordic prisons and penal practice as 'exceptional' in withstanding this era of penal excess. Whilst there is an array of literature surrounding penology in Norway and England, there is a lack of literature based around whether the Nordic penal practice could be successfully applied to prisons in England and Wales and therefore this dissertation aims to fill that gap. Through the use of semi-structured interviews, this research project uncovered a number of issues with implementing Nordic penal practice in England including a number of economic constraints and public and political outcry towards the humaneness of offender treatment. However participants within this study were overwhelmingly in favour of the humanitarian treatment and conditions within Nordic prisons and felt that if gradually integrated, Nordic penal practice could be successfully implemented in England and Wales.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 19 Oct 2016 12:45
    Last Modified: 19 Oct 2016 12:45
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22393

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