The recognition of psychopathy in OASys: secondary data analysis exploring the proficiency of OASys risk assessments, when applied to the detection of psychopathic traits and patterns of behaviour

Goldsmith, Kathryn (2016) The recognition of psychopathy in OASys: secondary data analysis exploring the proficiency of OASys risk assessments, when applied to the detection of psychopathic traits and patterns of behaviour. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    OASys, the Offender Assessment System is the risk-needs assessment toll used for the categorisation and management of offenders within custodial and community settings (Williams, 2010). OASys reports, from a sample of high-risk offenders, formed the basis of this secondary data analysis within the quantitative paradigm. An explorative analysis regarding the proficiency of OASys when applied to the attempt to capture the markers of psychopathy, found that the majority of markers could not in fact, be identified. Eight of twenty items from the Psychopathy Checklist - revised were found however, six of which were suitable for analysis. The rates of occurrence within these items 'mapped' between the two tools were varied. Results indicated high levels of offenders whom had been first convicted between the ages of 10-17, additionally, the high levels of impulsivity and poor temper control were both exceedingly apparent,. within this dataset. These findings are all consistent with markers of psychopathy (Hare, 2003). However, the oft omitted psychopathic traits and patterns of behaviour infer that the opportunity to gather information important for the prediction of behaviour upon release (Porter, ten Brinke & Wilson, 2009), and treatment performance outcomes (Harris & Rice, 2006) may have been missed.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 19 Oct 2016 12:16
    Last Modified: 19 Oct 2016 12:16
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22389

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