Protection versus privacy: identifying the correlation between George Orwell's 'Nineteen eighty-four' and modern Society: are ·we heading towards a Big Brother state?

Benwell, Hannah (2016) Protection versus privacy: identifying the correlation between George Orwell's 'Nineteen eighty-four' and modern Society: are ·we heading towards a Big Brother state? BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The term Big Brother is described as a person or organisation that exercises total doctoral control over people's lives. This expression originated from Orwell's 'Nineteen Eighty four' novel to describe the collectivist government overruling society, also known as totalitarianism. However, the repeated reference to Orwell's novel within modern society has caused debate over the privacy issues concerned with surveillance techniques.
    Considering the 5.9 million CCTV cameras in the United Kingdom, the steady wearing down of civil liberties, and the tougher legislation which facilitates the coming of a carceral state, this dissertation cross-examines public opinion using relevant empirical literature to investigate the link between the dystopian nature of George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-four and the related criminological, social and political aspects of modern society. This dissertation also probes the implications of CCTV and explores the criminal justice reaction to sexual offenders, ascertaining whether surveillance methods are disproportionate and intrinsically invasive. Online questionnaires were distributed to ninety-five participants to establish their attitudes towards an increasingly totalitarian state.
    The study presents evidence to suggest a link between the core aspects of Orwellian society and its replication in today's contemporary society. Findings reveal that surveillance techniques are excessive, invasive and often disproportionate in terms of its objectives. Having said that the public response towards surveillance techniques was accepting and an upward spiral of punitiveness was illustrated towards sexual offenders, supporting the assumption that moral enterprise and penal populism offer justification for draconian legislation. Accordingly, the perception of the future is a threat of mounting surveillance yet as Orwell recognised; conformity is central to a Big Brother society.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 19 Oct 2016 10:59
    Last Modified: 19 Oct 2016 10:59
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22377

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