An evaluation of the effectiveness of specific intervention methods used to treat speech-sound delays in “s” consonant clusters at school age

Hooker, Victoria (2016) An evaluation of the effectiveness of specific intervention methods used to treat speech-sound delays in “s” consonant clusters at school age. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    In speech and language therapy, language and communication disorders and delays can require many different methods in order to treat and improve impairment or disorders. Depending on the impairment and the needs of the individual, the type of approach and extent of the interventions received can vary. The aim of this investigation is to observe and evaluate the use and resulting effectiveness of methods of intervention for phonological impairment and delay given weekly to year one children (aged five-six) at a local educational establishment (ARK Dickens Primary Academy) each with differing levels of severity regarding phonological delays – one with mild to moderate difficulty, one with moderate difficulty and one with moderate to severe difficulty. The children took part in two tests to compare the improvements made following intervention. An initial test to assess the participant’s abilities was applied in the first term of the year, using methods based on the cookie theft picture, familiar games of “snap” and picture naming tasks incorporating a mix of approaches. The test was repeated approximately four months later for comparison.
    The initial tests showed frequent consonant cluster reduction for all children, and some cases of substituting individual sounds in approximately 50% of all uses of s-cluster sounds. All children made significant improvements after four months of weekly in-school intervention; each child’s rate of error dropped by more than 50% by the second round of tests and the overall use of correct s-clusters by each child doubled, giving evidence that the mix of traditional methods with core vocabulary approaches and picture naming tasks were effective intervention plans for this group of children.
    Conclusions and assumptions that a general mix of approaches is clearly effective could be made, however overlap between each method makes the inclusion of various task types easier.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Languages and Area Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 18 Oct 2016 12:51
    Last Modified: 18 Oct 2016 12:51
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22352

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