An investigation into the approaches used for addressing foreignness in subtitles: by translating and subtitling the French film Né Quelque Part as evidence

Bradshaw, Rebecca Elizabeth (2016) An investigation into the approaches used for addressing foreignness in subtitles: by translating and subtitling the French film Né Quelque Part as evidence. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This dissertation is based on the translation and analysis of the film Né Quelque Part. Its particular focus is on how subtitling handles foreignness to produce an effective translation between French and English. The analysis was based on the assumption that some elements would be lost through translation. Therefore, the main objective of the dissertation has been to analyse if subtitling creates the same experience for its new audience. The process in which this question has been answered is as follows. Firstly, the film has been translated and subtitled, in agreement with subtitling standards. A source text and film industry analysis were made to enable the subtitles to meet the expectations of the foreign audience. Subtitling was then focused on to assess their success in translating film. Lastly, this was combined to analyse the components of foreignness in the subtitles of Né Quelque Part so that conclusions on the approaches to foreignness could be made. The findings from the research show that subtitles require the original text to be adapted considerably as a result of foreignness. This research concludes that the foreign audience does not experience the film in the same way, although this is not necessarily a negative outcome as the foreign audience has different expectations and purposes for watching the film. The aims of the translator require that there is a careful balance of both familiarity and foreignness, meaning that various aspects of the original culture are conveyed to maintain an authentic experience whilst still being comprehensible to the new audience.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Languages and Area Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 17 Oct 2016 14:40
    Last Modified: 17 Oct 2016 14:40
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/22326

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