The impact of training in ensuring health and safety in Saudi Arabia construction site: the case of Al Harbi Trading & Contracting

Alotaibi, Faisal Abdulrahman (2016) The impact of training in ensuring health and safety in Saudi Arabia construction site: the case of Al Harbi Trading & Contracting. BEng dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Training has become a huge implementation practice that is being deployed by construction organisations in forestalling the impact of constructions site accidents. Organisational safety and health (OSH) has become a fundamental concern in the construction industry based on the prevalent risk in constructions sites. Governments and other industrial stakeholders are concerned with the need for improved behaviour and conduct by employees. Construction companies continue to explore means of improving safety for employees through training.
    This research was conducted at Al-Harbi Trading & Contracting who is a leading construction firm at Saudi Arabia. 37 employees participated in the research. Out of the 37, 30 took part in the questionnaire while the remaining 7 participated in the interview. The thematic approach was adopted for the data analysis in combining both the findings from the questionnaire and interview.
    The findings from the primary research established that training is a major implementation that has influenced improved behaviour by staffs at Al Harbi Trading & Contracting, OSH training is a fundamental part of the general training and it is done at the inauguration of a new construction site. Training increases the knowledge and awareness of how employee responds in the occurrence of accidents. Training target the behaviour of employees towards transforming it into becoming safety conscious and cultured.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Technology > School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 06 Sep 2016 13:31
    Last Modified: 06 Sep 2016 13:31
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/21758

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