Investigation on the effects of internal structure and mechanisms of soil blocks reinforced with natural fibers

Georgiou, Zinon (2016) Investigation on the effects of internal structure and mechanisms of soil blocks reinforced with natural fibers. BEng dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The use of natural fibres in soil blocks, increases the interest around the world as it is a beneficial solution for the environmental and economic sectors. At the moment it has caused the interest to a lot of researchers, as well as to the construction industry, due to the low cost of the artifact/product, and its environmental benefits. Natural fibres from trees can be used as a reinforcing element in the soil blocks, resulting a light weight product with increased strength and of course low cost. It is of great importance, because developing a low cost product from naturally available sources, will be beneficial for people with low income, especially to those in the non-developed regions around the world.
    This technique of construction, subsists since the ancient times and it is still in use, by a serious amount of people, focusing mainly in the low income areas. It is worth to list that a lot of researchers showed an interest of investigating the properties and the admixtures of soil blocks, in order to make them more durable and strengthen by mixing a variety of sources like agriculture waste, natural fibres, and cement. Also the use of natural fibres triggered the attention for research on the insulation properties of the blocks. However more researches have to grow for better understanding of the load transfer mechanisms and for better performance of the reinforced soil blocks.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Technology > School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 05 Sep 2016 08:59
    Last Modified: 05 Sep 2016 08:59
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/21699

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