To compare commonly used plants in constructed wetlands, and find which proves to be most effective in forced bed aeration in a constructed wetland

Kavanagh, Rory (2016) To compare commonly used plants in constructed wetlands, and find which proves to be most effective in forced bed aeration in a constructed wetland. BEng dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The aim of this research project is to compare commonly used plants used in Constructed Wetlands, and find which proves to be the most effective when used in Forced Bed Aeration in a Constructed Wetland. The objective of it all is to compare the effectiveness of the commonly used reed Phragmites, currently used at the moment in constructed wetlands against a different reed Phalaris.
    In order to be able to test the two against each other three separate microcosm reed bed systems will be developed in the university laboratory. One reed bed system with Phragmites, one with Phalaris and the last without any reeds and use that one as a control. Testing the three reed bed systems on a weekly basis testing for the removal of, Total Suspended Solids (TSS), Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) and the ammonia levels, Plant height and shoot count.
    As there have been reports of poor growth for the Phragmites in constructed wetlands, it is important to see if the Phalaris reed could be a potential replacement. So with the results that are gathered a recommendation will be given on which would be best fit for future constructed wetlands.
    The value of this project could be fairly substantial if it proves that Phalaris is the more effective reed, but there are a few limitations that could cause a massive effect. Firstly the growth of the reeds has to be taken into account. As in they may not be able to grow properly under the conditions in the winter time. This would obviously effect the project in a huge way and my results would show this. But giving them as much sunlight as possible to make sure they have the best chance of growing properly.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Technology > School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 01 Sep 2016 13:45
    Last Modified: 01 Sep 2016 13:45
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/21681

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