Investigation of the effect of multiple subsurface berms on the hydraulic performance of stormwater retention ponds

Horswell, Anthony (2016) Investigation of the effect of multiple subsurface berms on the hydraulic performance of stormwater retention ponds. MEng dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This project aims to investigate the role that subsurface berms have in increasing hydraulic performance of ponds in terms of residence time. With the use of MIKE 3, a 3D modelling computer programme, the simulation of 13 different ponds with varying numbers and heights of subsurface berms were simulated using tracer tests to investigate the flow of water through the ponds. The results from the tracer tests were used to produce retention time distribution (RTD) curves and to calculate three different parameters; short circuiting factor, effective volume ratio and hydraulic efficiency. The three parameters were selected as they covered a range of aspects of the flow of the water.
    It was found that increasing the number and height of subsurface berms both lead to an increase in the short circuiting factor, effective volume ratio and hydraulic efficiency. Furthermore the flow through the ponds reaches more plug flow like conditions. Increasing the height of the subsurface berms lead to a decrease in the actual peak concentration but the opposite is true for increasing the number of subsurface berms.
    The ponds used in this project are theoretical yet the results still give understanding to the role which subsurface berms play in effecting hydraulic performance. Furthermore this project fills a void within this field of engineering where work investigating subsurface berms is relatively limited.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Technology > School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 01 Sep 2016 10:36
    Last Modified: 01 Sep 2016 10:36
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/21658

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