Black & minority groups, women and their representation in media

McKellar-Ricketts, Hannah Concetta (2016) Black & minority groups, women and their representation in media. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (5MB)

    Abstract

    The purpose of this Special Investigation (SPIN) is to explore issues that are particular to Black & minority groups and women and to further develop an understanding of how these groups might be represented within media.
    The Special Investigation is comprised of four articles that have been written in the style of Vice magazine’s online website as well as an essay related to the SPIN title.
    The first feature is titled “Does Afro hair have a place on screen” which looks at how the Afro is often excluded from television and film. The second feature is entitled “Is feminism only for white girls”. This article debates the importance of intersectionality and examines whether the feminist movement can lack the visibility of certain ethnic groups.
    The third feature looks at the debate surrounding appropriation and is titled “Cultural borrowing - or is it stealing?”. This article explores the positive and negative ways that cultural borrowing might be regarded, drawing on examples of cultural practices that have been adopted by those outside of that culture.
    The final feature discusses gender and racial diversity in literature and is titled “Turning the page on books by white men”. This feature draws its idea from an experiment by writer K.T. Bradford who decided not to read books by white, cis gender, heterosexual men in order to discover novels by writers of more niche groups. This SPIN feature considers whether this might be an interesting way to explore literature or whether it might make reading too divisive.
    Finally The Special Investigation includes an essay titled ‘The British Press and its treatment of black and minority groups, women and the working class.’ This essay examines how the British press might marginalise black & minority groups, women and the working classes.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Social, Historical and Literary Studies
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 31 Aug 2016 12:30
    Last Modified: 31 Aug 2016 12:30
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/21631

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...