The dark side of boxing

Horan, Matt (2016) The dark side of boxing. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (454kB)

    Abstract

    Being the only sport where two men go toe to toe and draw blood, sweat and tears in an attempt to hurt and defeat each other, there frankly is no sport quite like boxing. It is a sport that can take struggling children off the street and bring them eventual financial stability and overwhelming success through the art of the sweet science. Despite the overriding positives that come out of such a popular and historical sport, there will ultimately always be negatives drawn out.
    The features within “The dark side of boxing” seek to explore some of these supposedly negative associations and try to uncover how detrimental they really are for those affected. While on one hand, the features report on the controversial aspects of depression and serious injury, on the other they investigate the revival of the unlicensed boxing scene and the historical association of racism with the sport.
    The essay part of this investigation also relates to boxing and places a particular focus on British Pakistani boxer Amir Khan. The essay is entitled: “The dark side of boxing: An investigation into the portrayal of British Asian sports stars in the UK press over the past 15 years, with a particular focus on boxer Amir Khan,” and argues that British Asian sports stars are negatively portrayed in the UK print media and explores the reasons for this. An underrepresentation in both the press room and on the sporting field is one reason, while the ongoing ‘War on terror’ has had a hugely detrimental effect, leading to an ‘othered’, criminal depiction of Muslims. Khan is primarily used as a case study to assess this.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Social, Historical and Literary Studies
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 31 Aug 2016 12:21
    Last Modified: 31 Aug 2016 12:21
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/21630

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...