Severe mental illness: internalised stigma and its implications for quality of life and recovery

Waters, Elizabeth Mary (2016) Severe mental illness: internalised stigma and its implications for quality of life and recovery. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    People with a severe mental illness are one of the most stigmatised and discriminated against members of society. Sometimes people with a mental illness internalise this stigma and this can lead to negative consequences.
    This literature review explores internalised stigma and its implications for recovery and quality of life. The findings have revealed how frequently people with a severe mental illness struggle to integrate with family, friends and the community. These struggles are a result of diminished self-efficacy, low self-esteem and engulfment in illness which have all been shaped by internalised stigma.
    The results have suggested that mental illness stigma is still prevalent in society and further anti-stigma initiatives should be welcomed. Social workers can help alleviate the negative effects of internalised stigma through empowering interventions and promoting the social model of disability.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences and Social Work
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 05 Aug 2016 15:12
    Last Modified: 05 Aug 2016 15:12
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/21381

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