An assessment of the economic sustainability of the commercial rattan trade for the communities surrounding the Lambusango Forest Management area, in southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia.

Lumley-Holmes, Claire (2006) An assessment of the economic sustainability of the commercial rattan trade for the communities surrounding the Lambusango Forest Management area, in southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    It difficult to imagine a problem that merits greater human concern than the conservation of biodiversity (Salafsky, et al., 2002). It is inevitable that nature's isolation within parks will progress globally, as unprotected land is invaded or under increasing pressure from man (Van Schaik & Rijksen, 2002). In recent years the management of these natural resources has been dominated by attempts to integrate conservation with development. Non-timber forest products (NTFPs), such as rattan are widely acclaimed for their potential as a vehicle for this approach (Arnold & Perez, 2001, Tickton, 2004). This study aimed to determine the economic sustainability of the commercial extraction and distribution of rattan, as an incentive for local communities surrounding the Lambusango Forest, to curb activities that destroy the forest. Study Objectives To identify the actors in the economic system of rattan extraction and distribution. To determine the nature of the workload carried out by those generating an income from rattan extraction and distribution, with emphasis on the calculation of the opportunity costs for those involved. To quantify the financial costs and incomes accruing to actors at each stage of the commercial rattan trading network, paying particular attention to the amount of rattan involved. Structured interviews with semi structured components were conducted in the villages of Labundo, Lawele, Watambo and Kabungka. Actors were questioned regarding, gender, age, ethnicity, seasonality, regularity & intensity of the work, equipment costs, financial returns per 100 kg and annual incomes. Rattan has generated a substantial financial value for the forest in the past, providing a supplement or predominant income when employment opportunities are limited. However the trade has ceased in 3 of the study villages. Extraction requires limited capital investment and is conducted over a short period, but the work is intensive, physically demanding and with high opportunity costs. Alternative predominant incomes act in direct competition with rattan's incentive to protect the forest. Therefore future studies are needed to examine the potential to sustainably make rattan a primary income, by increasing the financial benefits accruing to rattan extractors.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > Department of Geography
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:47
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:13
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/211

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