“Throwing themselves against each other, more or less like he-goats”: an investigation into the cultural resistance displayed by African slaves in Brazil.

Field Gillard, Daniel (2016) “Throwing themselves against each other, more or less like he-goats”: an investigation into the cultural resistance displayed by African slaves in Brazil. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This study aims to illuminate the importance of study into cultural forms of resistance, specifically to Brazilian history and the Black Atlantic diaspora. Contrary to early academic study, which presented slaves in Brazil as docile, a plethora of slave resistance has been uncovered, and the study of this resistance increased after the midway point of the twentieth century. An inquiry into the development of this discourse in Brazil notes that majority of scholarship surrounding the study of slavery is concentrated around overt forms of opposition, such as armed rebellion. However, in recent times an increase in the study of cultural resistance can be shown. This study analyses forms of overt resistance, such as runaway slaves and their fugitive slave communities, investigating how successful they were as forms of resistance. As well as this, an argument is presented that cultural resistance can be observed in these settlements by means of African cultural continuity, and is therefore entwined with traditional, overt resistance. The martial art-dance of capoeira and Afro-Brazilian religion Candomblé, most commonly found in the state of Bahia, are shown to have strong African roots as well as being perceived as significant forms of resistance by the authorities. Ultimately, this dissertation will highlight the significance of African cultural resistance in Brazil, and imply that more attention should be paid to these forms as they as it has much to offer Brazilian history and the Black Atlantic diaspora.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Social, Historical and Literary Studies
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 21 Jun 2016 16:00
    Last Modified: 21 Jun 2016 16:00
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/20926

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