London Gatwick Airport: an investigation into what pro expansion and anti expansion groups at Gatwick have learnt from the development of London Heathrow Terminal Five.

Ironmonger, Simon (2006) London Gatwick Airport: an investigation into what pro expansion and anti expansion groups at Gatwick have learnt from the development of London Heathrow Terminal Five. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The aviation industry provides considerable benefits to the UK. However it also causes many problems, the most significant problem being its heavy contribution to global climate change. Air travel in the UK is forecast to rise three-fold by 2030. Gatwick is due to get a second runway if Heathrow cannot meet its environmental targets. This study investigates specifically what pro expansion and anti expansion groups at London Gatwick Airport have learnt from the development of London Heathrow Terminal Five. This is done in the context of the current debate over a proposed second runway at Gatwick Airport. Primary and secondary data was collected to complete the aims and objectives of this study. Face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were held with key individuals representing groups who have a significant stake or interest in Gatwick Airport. An extensive literature research was also undertaken. The logical order of the chapters within this dissertation helps one fully understand the purpose of the study, providing the essential background information needed to put it into context and clearly demonstrating what the results and conclusions were. This dissertation indicates that sustainable aviation involves a healthy balance of both the positive and the negative impacts the industry exerts, which is currently far from being achieved. Airport expansion debates are much more complex than may be first imagined. They are rooted in local and global politics. Ultimately this dissertation concludes by explaining that the GACC have learnt to work with other campaign groups, focusing on pushing the argument regarding climate change, as this is a much stronger argument than local issues. The BAA have learnt to form good relationships with local groups, thus gaining support and reducing opposition. Most importantly they have learnt to bring attention back to local issues as these can be mitigated during planning inquiries.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > Department of Geography
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:47
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:13
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/206

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