Preventing counterfeit medicines in less developed countries: a qualitative study, examining the effectiveness of crime opportunity reducing techniques at the community level

Farrant, Stephen (2015) Preventing counterfeit medicines in less developed countries: a qualitative study, examining the effectiveness of crime opportunity reducing techniques at the community level. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The majority of the effort to detect and prevent counterfeit medicines is focused at the global level on ‘top-down’ solutions, such as international enforcement, global regulation, intellectual property rights and formulating terms of reference. This dissertation examines the ‘bottom-up’ approach of using crime opportunity reducing techniques at the community level to prevent the use of counterfeit medicines in less developed countries and whether such an approach is effective in reducing counterfeit medicines and is compatible with ‘top-down’ approaches.
    Acknowledging that preventing counterfeit medicines is a complex issue involving multiple stakeholders at community, national and international level, the key aim of this dissertation is to evaluate the effectiveness of different situational crime prevention interventions at the community level. In order to do so, the routine activity theory, rational choice theory and crime pattern theory are used to evaluate the effectiveness of possible interventions.
    Qualitative data was collected by interviewing eight people with extensive and diverse experience of preventing counterfeit medicines and also first-hand experience of working with communities in low socio-economic countries.
    Analysis of the results of the interviews identified an abundance of activity at the global and national levels in the fight against counterfeit medicine. However, it was unusual to discover that there is very little activity at the community level in terms of crime prevention and as such, there are a number of effective interventions that can be introduced at the community level at minimal cost.
    Primarily, this dissertation concludes that by evoking community spirit to increase guardianship, combined with cost effective interventions to strengthen community healthcare schemes ‘bottom-up’ approaches can be effective and compatible with existing ‘top-down’ initiatives. Subsequently, it supports the argument that situational crime prevention techniques can help to prevent counterfeit medicines at the community level in less developed countries; a previously under-researched area.
    Implications of the findings and areas for further research are identified and discussed.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 22 Feb 2016 12:14
    Last Modified: 22 Feb 2016 12:14
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/19857

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