Community policing in Cyprus: public perceptions of community policing units

Yiallouros, Katerina (2015) Community policing in Cyprus: public perceptions of community policing units. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Community Policing is a form of policing that has been operating in many cities in various countries for a large number of years, for example London and Edinburgh in the United Kingdom; Lincoln, Nebraska and Farmington Hills, Michigan in the USA. The purpose of community policing is to provide feelings of security for the inhabitants and minimize the crime rate level in areas where this form of policing is applied. Some countries have more recently introduced this type of policing, displaying only a fraction of years of activity compared to other countries, for example in Cyprus with a date of establishment being the year 2003. The purpose of the present study is to analyze the public perception of the effectiveness of a newly established community policing unit, based on that in Cyprus. A questionnaire was used with 50 participants and questions were answered mostly on a Likert scale, including one open ended question. The replies received from the sample of 50 participants were quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed. All information was cross referenced across all questions in order to identify any correlations between the answers. The purpose of the study was to obtain information regarding the public’s perception of the community policing unit in Cyprus. The results of the analysis showed an overall positive perception of community policing but there seems to be doubt as to whether the community policing officers could be called upon when an issue is to be reported.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 22 Feb 2016 11:26
    Last Modified: 22 Feb 2016 11:26
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/19847

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