TICs: the Trojan Horse in intelligence collection? the appropriateness of the ‘Taking Offences into Consideration’ process, as dual crime control and covert intelligence gathering methodology during contemporary policing

Watson, Joel MacDonald (2015) TICs: the Trojan Horse in intelligence collection? the appropriateness of the ‘Taking Offences into Consideration’ process, as dual crime control and covert intelligence gathering methodology during contemporary policing. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (830kB)

    Abstract

    The ‘Taking Offences into Consideration’ (TIC) process facilitates a suspect’s right to a fair trial and, in doing so, often determines that the police are the sole conduit for collection of historic offence admissions from those in custody. Consequently, it is an integral crime-control tactic within contemporary police forces yet there has been limited academic research into the processes and issues involved.
    This dissertation rectifies this by examining its practical application in policing and its impact on issues such as the balance of justice between victims and offenders, and the consequential accountability and governance of police. The aim of this dissertation is to value the effectiveness of the process by review of relevant literature, background interviews with operational detectives involved in TIC collection, and subsequent analysis of the key arguments for and against its use.
    Overall, it is apparent that during current fiscal austerity, quality intelligence is a valuable commodity that provides return on investment and succession-planning in policing skill-sets. Also, from this examination, it became evident that the process has an unknown capability and dual function as an important covert intelligence collection conduit when utilised correctly.
    Discontinuance in the tactic should not be a consideration but with safeguards apportioned, including training and possible statutory framework to provide protection for all concerned in the process, it can continue to be a successful part of policing.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 22 Feb 2016 11:22
    Last Modified: 22 Feb 2016 11:22
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/19846

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...