Interviewing serious acquisitive crime suspects: an examination of the perceptions and approaches of practitioners regarding the use and effectiveness of the PEACE interviewing model

Linsdell, John (2015) Interviewing serious acquisitive crime suspects: an examination of the perceptions and approaches of practitioners regarding the use and effectiveness of the PEACE interviewing model. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This dissertation will examine current investigative interviewing practices displayed by police officers involved in the investigation of serious acquisitive crime. Acquiring the principals of the PEACE model of investigative interviewing has been a mandatory training requirement for all police officers concerned with investigating crimes since 1994. This arose from substantial concerns that were identified in the latter part of the 20th century regarding the approach of the police to interviews involving suspects in custody. It was identified that police lacked the skills to perform this task effectively on a consistent basis. It was also apparent that there was an entrenched culture that the purpose of suspect interviews was to obtain confession evidence. Aligned to this were practices where coercion and ill treatment were used to gain admissions. Contemporary concerns addressed the treatment of vulnerable or suggestible detainees during police interviews. Such issues were central to the Fisher report that identified vulnerable suspects involved in a murder enquiry provided false confessions as a result of unacceptable interrogation practices employed by the police. This led to the completion of seminal studies conducted by academics and criminal justice institutions which led to the development of a forensic approach to investigative interviewing. The emphasis of this approach aligned the investigator with the role of an impartial gatherer of facts and information. The investigative interview became an opportunity for the suspect to provide an accurate account of their actions without the prospect of psychological or coercive pressures. This research provides an opportunity to assess contemporary approaches by practitioners to investigative interviewing in a key area of police business.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 22 Feb 2016 11:10
    Last Modified: 22 Feb 2016 11:10
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/19843

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