Is content and language integrated learning (CLIL) a viable option for language learning in the UK and what are the implications for British schools wishing to make provision for CLIL?

Fuchs, Caroline (2015) Is content and language integrated learning (CLIL) a viable option for language learning in the UK and what are the implications for British schools wishing to make provision for CLIL? MA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The aim of this study is was to investigate in depth the feasibility of content and language integrated learning (CLIL) for teaching second languages in the UK. The research was carried out through a series of interviews with teachers and members of the senior management team in a case study school and through class observations. The research indicates issues arising over motivation and attitude to language learning influenced by the UK school system and pressure of targets for student attainment. Teachers’ attitudes to delivering instruction in this CLIL programme reflect both enthusiasm and skepticism. When interviewed most language teachers were positive about the CLIL programme but indicated that some subject teachers were not always convinced by this approach, raising concerns of a deficit in student subject knowledge occurring over a period of being taught in this CLIL programme. The results indicate a disconnect between the CLIL methodology currently accepted by researchers and what teachers are practising in class, presenting a need for specific training. Significantly, the paper refers to results collected and collated by the case study school, which show that impact on learning is unconvincing leading to doubts over the benefit of introducing CLIL. However, the results also reflect evidence of improvement in students’ attitudes to learning observed by teachers, which was recorded by the school. This could be considered a justification for CLIL programmes, especially when considering the need to offer an authentic alternative for learning and language that motivates learners and stops the current decline in language learning. A review of literature reflects an urgent need for employees with language skills. To conclude, this research project points to a need for further investigation into students attitudes to CLIL, but also the views of parents and subject teachers should be researched in more depth in order to fully understand the views of all stakeholders. CLIL is still very much in its infancy in the UK and if further research can provide more detail on improvement to attitudes to learning, the present nationwide support network would necessarily need to become more widely recognised.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Languages and Area Studies
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 08 Jan 2016 08:59
    Last Modified: 08 Jan 2016 08:59
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/19299

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