An evaluation of LiDAR and ordnance survey landform profile 1:10,000 DTM for creation of digital terrain models to aid flood risk modelling of hrydrogaphic environments. Case study: River Test

Fyall, Richie (2006) An evaluation of LiDAR and ordnance survey landform profile 1:10,000 DTM for creation of digital terrain models to aid flood risk modelling of hrydrogaphic environments. Case study: River Test. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The continued development of buildings on flood planes has meant that there is an increased need to monitor rivers and to model their behaviour for flood risk assessments to protect both life and infrastructure. Light Detecting and Ranging (LiDAR) has become a viable alternative within the data capture community for the collection of topographic features to base flood risk models on. The adoption of risk management strategies by the Government and European legislation such as the Water Framework Directive has meant that flood risk assessment is critical to many agencies within the United Kingdom. It is with this in mind that this study evaluates the accuracies between LiDAR and an Ordnance Survey-supplied Digital Terrain Model (DTM). The River Test was used as an example with LiDAR data supplied by the Environment Agency. A Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) survey took place and Ordnance Survey Landform Profile 1:10,000 DTM was used for comparison. It was found that both datasets had errors within them, yet LiDAR was as good as, and in many cases surpassed, the comparison dataset. Types of error were consequently explored and the conclusion reached that LiDAR is accurate enough to create a topographic environment suitable for modelling flood risk.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > Department of Geography
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:47
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:13
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/192

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