Relationship and impact of technology and student disengagement in higher education

Wielocha, Kamil (2015) Relationship and impact of technology and student disengagement in higher education. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    In the recent years technology has become a ubiquitous element of higher education. The research confirms that as many as 84% of students use electronic devices during lectures. Majority of today’s students are digital natives who have been interacting with technology from young age (Yong & Gates, 2014, p. 102) and arguably an attempt to capture their attention with traditional teaching methods can be a challenge. As a response, a steady evolution can be observed in the education system as technology is becoming increasingly embedded into the teaching programs (Bennet et al., 2008, p. 783).
    Although, technology can provide many benefits to both, students and scholars, it also introduces new drawbacks which are often ignored. The views about the usefulness of technology in higher education and the relating issues are divided and subject to further discussion. This study aims to investigate and conclude whether or not the use of technology by students in higher education reflects on student disengagement and the impact this may have on learning. The focus is also on discovering influences that could affect this potential relationship and its impact.
    For the purpose of investigation, primary and secondary research of the topic has been carried out, incorporating a number of qualitative and quantitative research methods. The data is analysed from a holistic perspective to comprehend the complexity of the topic in more depth.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Technology > School of Computing
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 03 Dec 2015 16:05
    Last Modified: 03 Dec 2015 16:05
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/19068

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