To what extent has Zambia domesticated the conventions against corruption which it ratified and has the country achieved any progress in the fight against corruption?

Mbelenje, Ennie (2015) To what extent has Zambia domesticated the conventions against corruption which it ratified and has the country achieved any progress in the fight against corruption? MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (1062kB)

    Abstract

    Corruption is a subject that has captured the attention of governments, scholars and evaluators for decades. No doubt, this is because of society’s appreciation of the devastating effects of corruption on development. As a result, many countries, including Zambia, have joined international efforts to combat corruption through ratification of regional, continental and international conventions against corruption. This dissertation examines whether Zambia has conformed to the main requirements of the conventions to which it is party. The research also seeks to assess whether Zambia has achieved significant progress in combating corruption after implementation of the key provisions of the conventions. The study is based on the analysis of secondary data.
    Research findings indicate that Zambia has domesticated the key provisions of the conventions against corruption. This is manifested by Zambia’s enactment of legislation criminalising corruption, the creation of institutions established to fight corruption, and the implementation of public sector reforms. Findings further indicate that Zambia’s implementation of anti-corruption measures and initiatives has not produced significant progress as evidenced by the continued existence of rampant corruption in the public sector and the country’s poor performance on global corruption indicators. This study has concluded that anti-corruption crusades can only succeed if there is demonstrable political will by government to support anti-corruption initiatives and promote cooperation with stakeholders; features which have not been consistent in the case of Zambia.
    In view of the findings, the research advocates for the creation of a national anti-corruption culture in which government, civil society and citizens participate in the anti-corruption agenda. This study also argues for the critical importance of government’s role in spearheading counter corruption activities in the country if meaningful progress is to be achieved.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 03 Dec 2015 12:39
    Last Modified: 03 Dec 2015 12:39
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/18999

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...