Does gender injustice exist following the recommendation of the Corston report (2007)?: a study of the vulnerabilities of domestic abuse, sexual abuse, rape and poverty.

Ley, Andrea (2015) Does gender injustice exist following the recommendation of the Corston report (2007)?: a study of the vulnerabilities of domestic abuse, sexual abuse, rape and poverty. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The focus of this dissertation is whether male offenders experience similar vulnerabilities, as identified for female offenders in the Corston report (2007), with the research examining domestic abuse, sexual abuse, rape and poverty arising from unemployment. The Corston report (2007) recommends that female non-violent offenders who pose no risk to the public should receive a community sentence as the norm, and as no such report exists for comparable male offenders the dissertation will attempt to determine if this can be seen as gender injustice.
    Using secondary data analysis it was found that men are not recognised as victims, but are seen as perpetrators of domestic abuse, sexual abuse and rape, due to the concepts of social construction, hegemonic masculinity and patriarchy which identify men as the dominant of the genders, and consequently men are under-reported as victims in official statistics. This limited the study in comparing this vulnerability of domestic circumstances between male and female offenders. When poverty arising from unemployment was considered it was also found that men are measured against their ability to adhere to social construction, hegemonic masculinity and patriarchy, which depicts men as the provider. It can be argued that when male offenders fail to conform to gender expectations they are punished more harshly than female offenders.
    The dissertation recommends that there is a need for social construction of men and hegemonic masculinity to reflect the socio-economic changes that have influenced the behaviours and expectations of men. The research found that vulnerabilities are pertinent to both male and female offenders, suggesting that vulnerabilities experienced by male prisoners needs to be explored further. Then it may be seen if a recommendation for non-violent offenders to receive community sentences should be the norm. Until then, this dissertation argues that gender injustice exists.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 03 Dec 2015 12:40
    Last Modified: 03 Dec 2015 12:40
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/18998

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