Criminal justice inspection – is it delivering improvement effectively?: a review of the literature concerning criminal justice inspection in England & Wales

Falconer, Matthew Paul (2015) Criminal justice inspection – is it delivering improvement effectively?: a review of the literature concerning criminal justice inspection in England & Wales. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Inspection plays a key role in ensuring the public accountability of the various agencies that make up the criminal justice system. At a time when financial constraints have seriously limited public spending the criminal justice Inspectorates are tasked with monitoring the efficiency and effectiveness of our police, prison, probation and court services. But is the investment in inspection “money well spent”?
    This research is based on an orthodox literature review that has attempted to identify and examine the most relevant academic and policy-based literature concerning the subject of public service inspection, with particular reference to criminal justice system inspection. There is a specific focus on Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and the Criminal Justice Joint Inspection programme, in order to see if inspection succeeds in its task of promoting improvement within the criminal justice system.
    The key findings are that there is a lack of research available on the efficacy of inspection in relation to the criminal justice system, and that whilst there are some theoretical suggestions provided by academics, there is no empirical evidence demonstrating that inspection delivers operational improvements and whether inspection programmes can be undertaken more cost effectively.
    The resulting recommendation is that there is a need for in-depth, empirical research into the current criminal justice inspection framework, in order to ascertain to what degree it is effective, and in turn facilitate informed discussion as to the best way forward.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 03 Dec 2015 12:43
    Last Modified: 03 Dec 2015 12:43
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/18991

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