Treatment of hydrocarbon contaminated drinking water in Niger Delta, Nigeria using low cost adsorbents (coconut shell)

Ogbonna, Odinaka Chamberlein (2015) Treatment of hydrocarbon contaminated drinking water in Niger Delta, Nigeria using low cost adsorbents (coconut shell). MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Purpose - This research assessed the viability of coconut shell activated carbon in the treatment of hydrocarbon contaminated drinking water. Taking into account oil spillages and hydrocarbon contamination in Niger Delta, the study reviewed the major causes of drinking water contamination, forms of treatment techniques, low-cost adsorbents, activated carbon and its application in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria.

    Research methodology/Approach – The study adopted the quantitative method of research. Quantitative test was carried out in order to ascertain the activation status of the activated carbon used in carrying out this study. Primary data were obtained and analysed using Langmuir and Freundlich Isotherm models. Using Microsoft excel, a regression analysis was carried out to establish the relationship between the equilibrium concentration (Ce) and the amount of contaminant adsorbed by the adsorbent (qe). The results were compared with existing work to have a better understanding of data that were obtained.

    Findings – The activated carbon used in this research did not achieve the expected result. The obtained results showed that the process involved during the laboratory experiment was more of a physical process that the much anticipated chemical process. Conclusively, the research found the need for further study if the adopted materials were to be used as a treatment mechanism in Niger Delta.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Technology > School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 13 Nov 2015 14:44
    Last Modified: 13 Nov 2015 14:44
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/18886

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