Behaviour of concrete exposed to fire: parametric study of thermal behaviour of C.F.S.T. columns exposed to fire using “Lusas’’

El Chammas, Fouad (2015) Behaviour of concrete exposed to fire: parametric study of thermal behaviour of C.F.S.T. columns exposed to fire using “Lusas’’. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Concrete is a material that has astounding natural behaviour when presented or exposed to flame/fire. It doesn't burn, i.e. it is non-flammable, and has a high thermal massivity, which essentially slows the spread of heat through concrete elements acting as a thermal insulator. Indeed, in most regular fire, the external layer of the concrete with a thickness nearly 3 to 5 cm is harmed (Denoël, 2007). Accordingly, numerous concrete buildings that experienced fire, can be decently restored and reused. An excellent case of the great behaviour towards fire of concrete structures is the Windsor Tower in Madrid (Denoël, 2007). The fire happened on 14 February 2005, during which the building was luckily empty. In spite of this, the flame spread over various floors and endured 16 hours, the building remained standing, as can be found in figure 1 below. The main part that did breakdown were the steel perimeter columns over the 20th floor, which supported the floors.
    The nature of concrete-based structures implies that they perform exceptionally well in fire. On the other hand, fire resistance of concrete shouldn’t be taken for granted and a proper structural fire design is needed. For example, the fires in the Great Belt tunnel (Denmark, 1994) and the Channel tunnel (UK/France, 1999) experienced wide-ranging damage and extreme spalling of the tunnel elements (68% - 100%) and was made of the recently developed high-performance concrete (Khoury, 2000). This shows that fire can have a devastating effect on concrete structures and should not be overlooked. Concrete is basically a complex and unpredictable material made up of several constituents, and its properties can change drastically when presented to high temperatures.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Technology > School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 13 Nov 2015 14:47
    Last Modified: 13 Nov 2015 14:47
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/18879

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