What works for parents with learning disability?: a critical evaluation of advocacy in child protection

Blake, Clare (2015) What works for parents with learning disability?: a critical evaluation of advocacy in child protection. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    People with a learning disability are afforded less resources in society and are less valued than those without. This extends to when they become parents, when they find themselves in a ‘no win’ situation, given higher expectations yet less support to help them. As a result they are more likely to find themselves negotiating the child protection system than parents who do not have learning disability.
    This literature review aims to explore the effects of this discrimination and examines how advocacy can alleviate it. The findings have revealed that the advocate takes on several roles; that of translator and facilitator of engagement, provider of emotional and practical support and that of a role model; that professional practice improves in the presence of the advocate.
    The findings suggest that although advocacy does start to diffuse the discrimination faced in the child protection system, advocacy alone is not sufficient to alleviate the entrenched structural discrimination faced by parents with learning disability.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences and Social Work
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 21 Aug 2015 12:47
    Last Modified: 21 Aug 2015 12:47
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/18082

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