The Problems encountered by engineers during the 1867-1881 Portsmouth Dockyard extension, and an examination of the solutions used to resolve them

Thavatheva, Mithulan (2015) The Problems encountered by engineers during the 1867-1881 Portsmouth Dockyard extension, and an examination of the solutions used to resolve them. BEng dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The theory of ‘path dependence’ states that any current decision an individual is faced with will rely on past knowledge trajectory even though the previous circumstances may no longer be relevant. This is one of the key reasons I undertook this project because I believe that one learns from previous mistakes and one’s current decisions are based on historical trajectory
    This project investigates the problems encountered in the 1867-1881 Portsmouth dockyard extension. Resources were researched in order to identify the major problems that affected the dockyard construction. The core problems recognised were two-fold, the difficulties in the insertion of piles and the use of concrete in construction. Secondary resources found at both the Portsmouth Naval Library and the Lloyd’s Register allowed the aforementioned problems to be identified.
    Primary Sources of information were also considered through interviews with learned professors; Ray Riley and Dr Robert Otter. A Site Visit was conducted and this allowed a more personal understanding of the structure, layout and the foundations of the dockyard. Through the site visit I was able to relay my heightened knowledge of the dockyard through the project.
    The literature review assesses six sources directly related to both the Portsmouth extension and other concerned dockyards whilst also looking at the equipment and materials used. My results highlight the fact that the problems faced were not as limiting as once presumed. The issues were not hugely significant because one can see that dockyards are currently still usable and efficient.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Technology > School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Aug 2015 16:31
    Last Modified: 20 Aug 2015 16:31
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/18078

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