Rainwater harvesting: improving the understanding of the physical processes related to the first flush diversion systems and to calibrate a system that was designed to measure first flush effect and build up after a storm-event

Bradbury, George (2015) Rainwater harvesting: improving the understanding of the physical processes related to the first flush diversion systems and to calibrate a system that was designed to measure first flush effect and build up after a storm-event. BEng dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Rainwater harvesting is used around the world to collect water for drinking, household use and agriculture. Rural communities or those who are not connected to a mains water supply rely on rainwater harvesting as a drinkable/potable water source.
    Rain water harvesting is seen as a suitable alternative to other already stressed and limited supplies of drinking water (Alder et al, 2011). With more than 60 million people worldwide using rain water harvesting and this is set to continue to grow as the strain on water resources increases (Elliott et all, 2011).
    Water quality is important for the health of the users and can be improved by adding a first flush diversion device. This diverts the initial run-off which contains a high level of contamination and prevents it from reaching the storage tank. As a result it will reduce the health risk caused by the contamination from the build-up on the roof. First flush devices are often poorly designed and do not divert enough water to have a significant effect on the quality of water harvested. A better understanding off the process that effect the effectiveness of first flush devices will allow for more effective first flush devices to be designed.
    This project will calibrate the equipment, allowing it to collect accurate data in the field. The data can be used to check for correlations that could be used to improve the methods used and effectiveness when diverting the first flush from reaching the storage tank.
    By changing the position of the conductivity meter the accuracy of its readings has been increased significantly. The turbidity meter has been tested successfully for a medium intensity rainfall event and shown that it is recording accurately

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Technology > School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 19 Aug 2015 16:43
    Last Modified: 19 Aug 2015 16:43
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/18062

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