Assessment of salt marsh management strategies to address problems of habitat decline, coastal defence and climate change in the United Kingdom

Parsley, Martin (2007) Assessment of salt marsh management strategies to address problems of habitat decline, coastal defence and climate change in the United Kingdom. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The decline of salt marsh ecosystems within the UK has lead to the use of management plans to reduce rates of erosion and provide enhanced flood protection to coastal areas. Managed realignment is a feasible option for salt marsh creation and protection against eroding coastlines, but is not viable for use in all situations. This dissertation aimed to provide an analysis of the methods for salt marsh management, in response to losses experienced in the UK. Case studies were gathered and critically analysed against a given criteria, to determine the relative merits and detrimental effects arising from the management plans. The criteria assessed schemes against the implementation, innovation, timescale, benefits and problems that occurred during and after the projects. The results indicated the most effective method for combating losses of marsh areas, was managed realignment. Although being highly expensive, it offers the greatest amount of flood and shoreline protection while creating gains in terms of highly productive salt marsh ecosystems. In areas where managed realignment is unfeasible (in urban and developed areas) it was found that inter-tidal recharge was the most cost-effective scheme of marsh restoration. The use of dredged materials provides added protection, allows for further vegetation colonisation and avoids costly maintenance to sea walls. From the literature analysed it can be seen that managed realignment is the most effective option available at present, but other traditionally unused schemes, could provide additional alternatives.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > Department of Geography
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 12 Aug 2015 09:44
    Last Modified: 12 Aug 2015 09:44
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/18025

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