To what extent does the Channel Island Archipelago fit Macarthur & Wilson's (1967) equilibrium theory of island biogeography and what is the theory's current status and future

De Carteret, Amy (2006) To what extent does the Channel Island Archipelago fit Macarthur & Wilson's (1967) equilibrium theory of island biogeography and what is the theory's current status and future. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    MacArthur & Wilson's equilibrium theory of island biogeography quickly became the paradigms of the field in the 1960s and has strongly influenced this and other disciplines of ecology and conservation for the past three decades (Lomolino, 2000a). This revolutionary theory has galvanised the field of biogeography into much research and debate over the last forty years. The aim of this dissertation is to explore the application and discuss this famous theory in the light of new critique from established members of the field. The study initially tests the extent to which the Channel Islands fit MacArthur & Wilson's Equilibrium Theory of Island Biogeography (ETIB). Confirmatory statistical techniques were used to measure the correlation between the variables and the amount of variation in species number explained. Numerous anomalies were discovered contradictory to the expected pattern. It was concluded that the Channel Islands do not fit the ETIB as only the species-area relationship was supported. The theory's validity has been questioned persistently over the last forty years. A critique looks at the validity and status of the theory. The ETIB is embedded in almost forty years of research not just in biogeography, but in many other fields. It would be impossible to completely disregard this foundational theory. It was concluded that, although it will remain foundational to the field it must be put to one side in order to let the new theories and ideas it has induced to come to fruition and contribute to this dynamic field.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > Department of Geography
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:47
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:13
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/180

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