The current state of buried services management at various organisations and the barriers to preventing service strikes and improving information

Gothard, Thomas (2015) The current state of buried services management at various organisations and the barriers to preventing service strikes and improving information. MEng dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the current state of buried services management at a variety of different organisations including airports and utilities providers. It also looked at the effects of services strikes on organisations and how these could be reduced. This project was chosen after witnessing how poor buried services information and a lack of coordination between service providers caused considerable damage to assets at an airport where the effects of disruption are multiplied. Striking services is not just a problem at airports but across the construction industry as it heavily effects roads and construction projects. The research itself involved interviewing representatives from organisations involved in the buried services management process, completing a case study on Heathrow Airport’s buried services management process and comparing service strike data between organisations. The interviews allowed a better understanding of the issues facing buried services management and why current methods weren’t always successful. Whereas the case study focused on an organisation that has an established method in which to manage services and continuously improve information on them. The results of the research showed there was no standardised process to manage buried services but new specifications and guidelines were being introduced to advise clients, such as PAS 128. Utilities providers stated that they rarely hit their own services but those owned by others. This was because they were able to more accurately locate their own services due to the information they held. This also showed a lack of coordination between service providers. A recommendation from this research is that any organisation involved in buried services management should adhere to relevant legislation (CDM, HSWA and NRSWA) and use guidelines such as PAS 128, PAS 1192-2, HSG47 and TSA – Utility Survey Guidance to develop a process. These documents give important requirements and advise as to how information should be used, stored and coordinated between organisations.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Technology > School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
    Depositing User: Alice Bentley
    Date Deposited: 06 Aug 2015 14:52
    Last Modified: 06 Aug 2015 14:52
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/17986

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