An exploration of the impact of video games on 10-11 year old boys

Reynolds, Rachel (2014) An exploration of the impact of video games on 10-11 year old boys. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The increased use of video games amongst children, particularly boys, is a subject much discussed in the media and is readily blamed for problems amongst the youth of today. Having witnessed discussions between year 6 boys aged 10-11 about the content of the games they are playing and the amount of time spent of them, this study aimed to find out whether playing video games does actually have any impact on young boys.
    While much literature can be found proclaiming the dangers of gaming amongst the young, there is very little evidence by way of studies to confirm this. Past studies are inconclusive as they only offer a snapshot in time. Long term research would need to be carried out requiring unrealistic commitment from both parents and children to confirm any effects of gaming on the young.
    The data collected for this study via focus groups and questionnaires highlighted that not only are boys spending a lot of their time gaming, but are also shown to be drawn to inappropriate, adult rated games which are graphically violent. The majority of children in the study have the games bought for them by their parents, which would imply they are playing these games with parental knowledge and consent. Whether parents are aware of the explicit content of the games is unknown, therefore it is recommended that a further study would be beneficial to verify this and discover how they feel once aware of the content.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Education and Childhood Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 16 Jul 2015 15:29
    Last Modified: 16 Jul 2015 15:29
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/17750

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