An exploration of how a visually impaired child in reception class is socially integrated into a mainstream school and whether their learning environment affects their ability to socially interact

Slater, Carolyn (2014) An exploration of how a visually impaired child in reception class is socially integrated into a mainstream school and whether their learning environment affects their ability to socially interact. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Inclusion in the curriculum has changed over the years and in particular, the inclusion of special needs children in mainstream schools. Luxford (1994) states that before the introduction of the Warnock Report (DES, 1978), special educational children were separated and schooled away from the other children in ‘educationally-subnormal schools’. The Special Educational Needs and Disability Act (SENDA) (2001) was introduced to amend Part 4 of the Education Act (1996), whereby making further provision against discrimination on the grounds of disability in schools. This dissertation explores how a visually impaired child is socially integrated into a mainstream school and whether the mainstream school is the most appropriate environment. The author of this dissertation has worked with a child with a visual impairment since 2010 and in 2012 the parents decided to send her to a mainstream primary school, having sent her to mainstream nursery.
    The focus of this dissertation was to ascertain whether sending this child to a mainstream school, was in fact the best decision or whether a specialist school would have been more suitable to her needs. In order to explore this, qualitative research was undertaken through the use of questionnaires, interviews and observations. The data from which were analysed and alongside the literature research, it was concluded that a specialist school would have been more beneficial as they would be able to accommodate all of the needs of the child, much more than a mainstream primary school.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Education and Childhood Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 16 Jul 2015 14:59
    Last Modified: 16 Jul 2015 14:59
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/17741

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