A review of factors that can have an effect on primary-aged children’s School Readiness when entering compulsory education

Mcdermott, Linda (2014) A review of factors that can have an effect on primary-aged children’s School Readiness when entering compulsory education. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    School Readiness is interrelated with learning readiness and at any developmental stage; a child may be ready or unready to interact with the educational stimuli/resources depending on their individual developmental and other developmental factors (SEN), socio-economic factors and external public factors. This dissertation reviews factors that can have an effect on primary-aged children’s School Readiness when entering compulsory education. A review of the academic literature is divided into three main sections, entitled; ‘Developmental Perspectives’, ‘Social Changes’ and ‘Multi-Agency’. A qualitative research strategy was used to establish how broad the term School Readiness is, and how children, families, educators and policy makers may lack a mutual understanding and expectation of the outcome. This dissertation emphasises how School Readiness can directly impact a child’s school performance, and highlights how vital it is for the child, family, educators, multi-agencies, and policy makers to share a mutual understanding of the term School Readiness to allow for a smooth transition to primary school. In addition, this dissertation recognises how social changes can either promote or delay a child’s School Readiness, and therefore it is crucial for children to receive the appropriate support within their home and learning environment.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Education and Childhood Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 15 Jul 2015 16:31
    Last Modified: 15 Jul 2015 16:31
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/17712

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