How similar is pet-directed speech to child-directed speech and, from this, is a purpose of pet-directed speech identifiable?

Dowding, Chloe Janina (2015) How similar is pet-directed speech to child-directed speech and, from this, is a purpose of pet-directed speech identifiable? BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    In British culture, as a nation of pet lovers, talking to your pet cat is not seen as unusual behaviour. However, why do we tend to change our voices often sounding like we are speaking to a child when we talk to them? Why do so many of us continue to talk to our cats frequently, even though we know they cannot understand us?
    This dissertation investigates pet-directed speech and child-directed speech to establish how similar these speech registers are. Additionally, it tries to discover a reason for using PDS when speaking to cats. Participants are recorded talking to their cats to identify any similarities between the two speech registers. Interviews are then conducted to enable the participants to reflect on their language used and elicit opinions about the possible reasons they talk to their cats. Additionally, Jakobson’s (1960) functions are used as a framework for analysis to explore whether these can explain the purpose of this speech register.
    Despite the vast amount of research that has been conducted on the subject of child-directed speech, very little literature has been published regarding pet-directed speech and the potential purposes behind it.
    This empirical research has shown a clear resemblance between pet-directed speech and child-directed speech. Additionally, it has produced interesting observations about the consciousness of this register, particularly the reflections of the participants has helped to propose a number of possible purposes. Moreover; these insightful findings have posed further questions regarding some of the speculations made about the use of child-directed speech. The insights obtained through researching this speech register are valuable and thought-provoking.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Languages and Area Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 09 Jul 2015 16:08
    Last Modified: 09 Jul 2015 16:08
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/17668

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