Anglo-Germanic language contact: Anglicism usage in German print media – to what extent is linguistic borrowing yet to increase in Germany?

Day, Harry Charles (2015) Anglo-Germanic language contact: Anglicism usage in German print media – to what extent is linguistic borrowing yet to increase in Germany? BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Since the 17th century Anglo-Germanic language contact has been increasing, due to an array of historical events including the industrial revolution, the two World Wars, and globalisation. With more intense language contact comes increased linguistic borrowing, namely transference of lexicon, and grammatical properties. After the Second World War Germany was split into four occupational zones, with half the country being occupied by English speaking nations, the United Kingdom and the United States. Since then the number of Anglicisms adopted into the German language has risen dramatically. The purpose of this dissertation is to assess the degree of linguistic borrowing of Anglicisms in Germany, using this knowledge to evaluate whether borrowing is yet to increase. By analysing the Anglicism content in three forms of German print media, all with varying demographics, a better observation of each publication’s writing style and Anglicism usage, depending on their target audience could be achieved. Using current newspaper articles and magazines granted a more precise evaluation of the state of the German language in terms of Anglicism usage. Research revealed that Anglicisms adopted in earlier centuries remain in use in current German print media, finding that publications with a younger demographic use a higher proportion of Anglicisms in their articles. Results show, if transfers from the late 20th and early 21st centuries in domains such as film, music and technology, areas dominated by English speaking nations – mainly the United States – continue to be used, then the sum of Anglicisms present in the German language will surpass 5,000, as Görlach suggests.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Languages and Area Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 08 Jul 2015 16:06
    Last Modified: 08 Jul 2015 16:06
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/17647

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