De Gaulle’s pursuit of grandeur: a visionary example of foreign policy or an elaborate evolution of the foreign policy adopted by the Fourth Republic?

Diffley, Connor Shane (2015) De Gaulle’s pursuit of grandeur: a visionary example of foreign policy or an elaborate evolution of the foreign policy adopted by the Fourth Republic? BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The theme of de Gaulle’s Fifth Republic and the foreign policy that came to define it has been the subject of extensive academic research since its establishment in 1958 and continues to be a contentious topic of discussion. The establishment of the Fifth Republic can be described as one of the most defining moments in post-war French history. Consequently, the significance of de Gaulle’s ambitious foreign policy of grandeur pursued during his presidency is of paramount importance in understanding how France evolved from a weak and politically divided country, to one of the leading European powers of the twentieth century.
    This research aims to show that although there were visionary aspects of de Gaulle’s foreign policy, the belief that the Fifth Republic’s foreign policy resulted in a definitive ‘break’ with that of the Fourth Republic is misleading and inaccurate. On the contrary, it will be shown that certain aspects of the foreign policy pursued by de Gaulle support the view that the Fifth Republic’s foreign policy was an elaborate evolution of the foreign policy pursued by the Fourth Republic.
    This research primarily addresses the subject of the foreign policy adopted by Charles de Gaulle from his return to power in 1958 until the ‘Empty Chair Crisis’ of 1965-1966, while also examining the most notable aspects of the foreign policy pursued by the Fourth Republic. The importance of the political ideology of grandeur will form an integral part in understanding the decisions taken by de Gaulle with regards to foreign policy from 1958 onwards. Moreover, it will be demonstrated that de Gaulle’s pursuit of grandeur and the protection of the ‘nation state’ were intrinsically linked and formed the bedrock of de Gaulle’s foreign policy.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Languages and Area Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 08 Jul 2015 15:39
    Last Modified: 08 Jul 2015 15:39
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/17646

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