How did the Argentine State emerge from the Dirty War? internal and external influences in the transition to democracy

Ronconi, Marzia (2015) How did the Argentine State emerge from the Dirty War? internal and external influences in the transition to democracy. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The so called Guerra Sucia (Dirty war) is the term given to the dictatorship that took power in Argentina between1976-1983. The Argentine state with the 1976 military coup d’état lost its legitimacy. This study proposes an evaluation of the Argentine transition to democracy, including the military ascent and the period of the Dirty War leading to the transition process. Applying Constructivist theorists Max Weber and Alexander Wendt, a theoretical framework will be provided in which to place the Argentine case. To elucidate this process, theoretical insights will be provided with regard to David Beetham’s theory on Democracy. The internal and external factors that contributed to the military demise and the transition to democracy will be analysed in order to understand how Argentine managed to reposition itself as a legitimate state after the serious violation of human rights it suffered at the hands of the military junta. Elucidations on Naomi Klein’s Disaster Capitalism will be offered to deepen a critical analysis on the influences - above all regarding the hegemonic role played by the U.S. - that strongly affected the junta’s rise and demise and the process of transition to democracy. The conclusion of this study places an emphasis on the contributions of internal and external factors influencing the key changes that took place in Argentina between 1970s-1980s.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Languages and Area Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 08 Jul 2015 14:58
    Last Modified: 08 Jul 2015 14:58
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/17638

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