Objectivity and media manipulation under pressure: a study of the coverage of the 2014 conflicts in Gaza

Rossi, Caterina (2015) Objectivity and media manipulation under pressure: a study of the coverage of the 2014 conflicts in Gaza. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The aim of this dissertation is to establish whether or not the British media have shown a pro-Israel bias when reporting on events taking place in Gaza in 2014. This thesis aims to explore the realm of war reporting, beginning with a reconstruction of the events that have led to changes in this field (e.g. embedded journalists, the Internet, 24/7 news), and concluding with a study of the coverage of the 2014 Gaza conflicts. This paper will start by exploring the concept of ‘objectivity’, specifically in war reporting. It will then provide a brief history of the long-running Israel-Palestine conflict and of the 2014 conflicts in Gaza. For the purpose of this research, the historical regression will start from the war of independence, which started in May 1948 with the Arab invasion. The dissertation will then discuss how war reporting of the Middle East has transformed, looking at what aspects have changed, its causes and effects. Finally results of a critical discourse analysis of the coverage of the most recent conflicts (Summer 2014) in Gaza by The Guardian, The Independent and Daily Mail, will be presented. For the purpose of this research, the dissertation will analyse news coverage of three events, which were deemed as crucial in the conflict: June 12 2014, when three Israeli students were murdered; July 8 2014, when Hamas launched 40 rockets on Israel and July 17 2014, which marks Israel’s first ground invasion since 2009. As said, these dates were chosen for the significance they had in shaping the 2014 conflict, one of the longest and deadliest in nearly 50 years. The paper will conclude that, overall, two of the publications provided a fairly balanced account of the events, while one, the Daily Mail, seemed to have failed in doing so.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Social, Historical and Literary Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 07 Jul 2015 15:18
    Last Modified: 07 Jul 2015 15:18
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/17627

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