To what extent does technology shape the consumption of content and how will the introduction of new technology change the consumption of content in the future?

Maeers, Jonathan (2015) To what extent does technology shape the consumption of content and how will the introduction of new technology change the consumption of content in the future? BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (3594kB)

    Abstract

    This project is investigating the extent that technology shapes content consumption and how the introduction of new technology will shape content consumption in the future. Firstly an investigation of past technologies and the effect they have had on content consumption has been conducted to form understanding how technology has previously shaped content consumption. Understanding why new technology has been introduced and how it has shaped content consumption will aid an investigation of future technology. The project then goes on to investigate present and emerging technologies assisted by a quantitative research survey to identify present consumption trends. Results from the survey have been used to form a starting foundation for research of future technology. The project identifies a three stage cycle of future technology and how content consumption may be shaped: Integration, Replacement and Counteraction. Through this cycle prospective future technology that will reshape content consumption has been identified. Internet television becomes a significant point in the project that leads to traditional television consumption viewing experiences, where 3D television becomes a recurring theme. The project is concluded with theory and a proposal for a perspective 3D television display and experience to be realized in the future.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Creative Technologies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 02 Jul 2015 08:56
    Last Modified: 02 Jul 2015 08:56
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/17584

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...