Is MIDI technology still relevant or suitable in modern audio systems and does this technology encourage or influence the users creative process?: a study using affordances and constraints

Fouracre, James Richard Ford (2015) Is MIDI technology still relevant or suitable in modern audio systems and does this technology encourage or influence the users creative process?: a study using affordances and constraints. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This study will examine the relevance and suitability of MIDI in modern audio systems and how heavily it can, or does, influence the way users work or directly affect their creative process.
    The study will begin by examining and exploring the theories of affordances and constraints, combined with other frameworks such as the spectrum of affordance as a basis for the methodology in completing this project. The way in which these theories and frameworks apply to the fields of music technology and HCI will enable the study to analyze the technology in a robust way.
    It will examine the history and inception of MIDI, assessing what contextual factors forced the need for a new technology and how this affected, and possibly influenced, the way in which people worked - both using MIDI directly and indirectly with other applications or software.
    It will also assess the specific affordances and constraints of MIDI, applying these theories and frameworks to analyze how relevant or suitable, if at all, the technology is and how the technology influences or encourages a users creative process.
    To reach a conclusion and answer the initial research question, the study will assess its findings and evaluate these based on the methodology used within the study and discuss how MIDI has influenced workflow and users creative process.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Creative Technologies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 01 Jul 2015 16:45
    Last Modified: 01 Jul 2015 16:45
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/17575

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