An investigation into the impact of workplace violence and aggression faced by ambulance service staff in the United Kingdom and their acceptance of the risks they face to deliver high quality patient care

Gallagher, Alan David (2015) An investigation into the impact of workplace violence and aggression faced by ambulance service staff in the United Kingdom and their acceptance of the risks they face to deliver high quality patient care. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Whilst the subject of workplace violence and aggression (WVA) has undergone a number of studies and been subject to many commentators such as professionals and academics alike, the subject within the National Health Service (NHS) is still constantly reviewed. In April 1996 the National Audit Office published a report titled ‘A Safer Place to Work – improving the management of health and safety risks to staff in NHS trusts’ (National Audit Office, 2003, p. 1). This publication may be one of the pivotal events for the NHS and the commencement of the journey to tackle WVA. In October 1999 the former Minister of State for Health, John Denham, made a bold statement whilst launching the NHS zero tolerance campaign.
    “Aggression, violence and threatening behaviour will not be tolerated any longer” (Denham. J. 1999)
    This study shall concentrate on evaluating the impact of WVA faced by NHS employees, whilst investigating existing and developmental control measures and their effectiveness in preventing WVA. To achieve the aims and objectives of the study a global literature review was conducted by means of a structured approach reviewing academic and professional material.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 30 Jun 2015 12:33
    Last Modified: 30 Jun 2015 12:33
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/17494

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