Conflict Resolution Training in the NHS: how effective has this been to-date in proactively reducing violence and aggression against front-line NHS Staff in the acute sector?

Clark, Alan (2013) Conflict Resolution Training in the NHS: how effective has this been to-date in proactively reducing violence and aggression against front-line NHS Staff in the acute sector? BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    All acute NHS bodies have been required, since 2004, to implement conflict resolutions training (CRT) using the then NHS Counter Fraud and Security Management Services (CFSMS) published guidance document on implementing a National NHS CRT Syllabus. This study reviews and analyses the available data to critically appraise whether the introduction of this CRT has been able to reduce violence and aggression against front-line NHS staff in the acute sector. It presents an evidence based review of both the literature and research data from a number of sources which is judged to be required if we are to be able to determine both the success of the current CRT programme and whether it meets the needs of front-line acute staff in today’s world.
    The research data includes a number of staff surveys carried out by both the Department of Health (DH) and the CFSMS, who have recently been re-branded as NHS Protect. The staff survey data presented from the DH and NHS Protect is extracted from these published staff surveys which ask a cross section of NHS staff to give their perception of both their exposure to violence and aggression as well how well they consider their trusts ability to manage violence and aggression. The primary research data presented sought to compare and contrast a specific CRT evaluation exercise carried out by the CFSM in 2004/05 with an NHS acute trust in 2012. The findings are able to show both the progress made since 2004 as well as identifying, within the acute sector, a specific need to update CRT to include detailed training on clinical and medical factors, which are shown to be a significant underlying cause of violence and aggression in the acute sector today.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 06 Mar 2015 14:39
    Last Modified: 06 Mar 2015 14:39
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/16874

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