The unintended consequences of EU crisis management militarisation: a documentary analysis of the discourse on the EU/NATO collaboration as part of a comprehensive approach to crisis management

Stiermstedt, Peter (2014) The unintended consequences of EU crisis management militarisation: a documentary analysis of the discourse on the EU/NATO collaboration as part of a comprehensive approach to crisis management. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    At the European epicentre of humanitarian and economical viability stands the EU equipped with unparalleled tools for large-scale crisis management. An added value of the EU is an integrated approach combining military and civilian instruments. Even though the rationale for crisis management may seem evident it still needs to be justified, particularly when it comes to crisis response and management partly or solely by military means. The fundamental question, and underlying conjecture, is whether or not further militarisation is necessary for EU crisis response to be deemed comprehensive? If so, to what extent and does that necessarily entail a closer relationship with NATO? The analytical procedures entails certain steps of finding, selecting, appraising and synthesising data contained in documents. The desire is to go beyond being merely a descriptive thematic analysis to reach a higher explanatory abstraction, making grounded theory a suitable choice. The analysis shows that Community represents what the CSDP and the entire EU needs to optimise global crisis management. On that point the findings of this research is clear, and put in its simplest form this can be translated as, militarisation of contemporary crisis management on a global scale is a necessity and the dependency, collaboration and coordination, in that order, with NATO is becoming increasingly marginal.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Centre for Studies in Literature
    Depositing User: Beth Atkins
    Date Deposited: 16 Jan 2015 14:49
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:48
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/16517

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